CROSS CUTTING ISSUES

This section provides a brief overview of the issues that impact and interact with more than one domain of economic, social and environmental development. The Cross Cutting Issues are not restricted to water management sector per se; on the contrary, decisions made in other sectors or nationwide scale, strongly influence how water policies perform in specific situations. The Cross Cutting Issues are grouped into five areas which include: gender, youth, governance, financing and transboundary cooperation. These issues require action in multiple fields and are not limited to water management. Understanding the nature of each of the Cross Cutting Issues in relation to water management is important in order to set up appropriate mechanisms and institutional arrangements. The Cross Cutting Issues and Critical Challenges are complementary sections to IWRM ToolBox Tools.

  • Gender and Water

    The water sector has been a pioneer in understanding that involvement of both men and women in water management is imperative to ensure development opportunities and equitable management. Even since 1977 at the United Nations Water Conference in Mar del Plata the question has been constantly raised. In 1992 at the International Conference on Water and the Environment in Dublin the central role of women in water management was clearly recognized (Dublin principle No. 3 on role of women in water management).

  • Youth and Water

    A significant percentage of the world’s population falls under the age of 35. The average age of the world population is 28. In many countries, young people make up more than 50 percent of the citizens. There is often very little involvement of youth in decision making process. Limited access to useful knowledge is the reason of a huge pressure on young people and intensifies the difficulties for them in participating in water management.

  • Financing and Water

    Until recently it was rare for water management planning to consider finance. Water advocacy and plans were often aspirational, neglecting to show where the money would come from, how activities would be financed or who would pay for them. This situation is changing, finance is now an essential topic in water management circles

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